Do You Believe in Good Luck?

Bumblefoot's Hamsa -- The longer I live the more I accept that anything is possible.  Can I truly attribute some good fortune to an amulet?  I don't know.  If I don't know, I have to be open to the possibility.  The power of *belief* is something real.  It's a beautiful gift from a friend, and the kindness of this gift on its own is strength for the soul." (Photo courtesy of Ron Thal)

Bumblefoot’s Hamsa (Photo courtesy of Ron Thal)

This photo was a late addition to my backstage blog post about Guns N’ Roses, and I didn’t want it to get lost in the abyss.

I’m not superstitious, but I love stories about baseball Hall of Famer Wade Boggs drawing a “Chai” symbol in the batter’s box for good luck before he faced a pitcher — and when I’m at the gym, I will grab locker #18 or #36 if they are available.

So I was intrigued when GNR guitarist Ron “Bumblefoot” Thal proudly showed off his hamsa backstage, proudly announcing that it came from Israel.

“The longer I live, the more I accept that anything is possible,” he later explained in an email. “Can I truly attribute some good fortune to an amulet? I don’t know. If I don’t know, I have to be open to the possibility. The power of ‘belief’ is something real. It’s a beautiful gift from a friend, and the kindness of this gift on its own is strength for the soul.”

Deep stuff. I think of every souvenir shop on Jerusalem’s Ben Yehuda Street when I see that necklace. I love those souvenir shops.

As an aside, I carry a “Good Luck” coin on my keychain from the 193os.

Legendary "Hell Driver" Lucky Teter gave out lucky coins at his stunt shows in the 1940s.

Legendary “Hell Driver” Lucky Teter gave out lucky coins at his stunt shows in the 1930s and 1940s.

I had the privilege of chasing amateur “Hell Driver” daredevils around the country for a year with filmmaker Peter Koziell. We sucked in a lot of exhaust and burning tires in between interviews for our documentary, “Hell Drivers: America’s Original Crash Test Dummies.”  Anything for the story.

Lucky wasn’t so lucky. He died during one of his stunts. His good luck charm reminds me to never deliberately crash my car into brick walls AND represents a hope that I’ll eventually be able to make the time and chalk up the resources to produce another documentary film.

Maybe I should add a hamsa to my keychain, too.

 

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